NABEYA Yuzu Juice 1.8l - Together Store South Africa
NABEYA Yuzu Juice 1.8l - Together Store South Africa
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NABEYA Yuzu Juice 1.8l

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Food products only available in Cape Town and surrounds.

What is Yuzu?

Yuzu (Citrus junos, from Japanese 柚子 or ユズ) is a citrus fruit and plant in the family Rutaceae of East Asian origin. It is believed to have originated in central China as a hybrid of mandarin orange and the ichang papeda.

The yuzu is called yuja (from Korean 유자) in Korean cuisine. Both Japanese yuzu and Korean yuja are borrowings of the Chinese youzi (柚子), though this Chinese word now refers to the pomelo.

East Asia - Culinary use

Japan
Though rarely eaten as a fruit, yuzu is a common ingredient in Japanese cuisine, where the aromatic zest (outer rind) as well as juice are used much in the same way that lemons are used in other cuisines. The yuzu's flavour is tart and fragrant, closely resembling that of the grapefruit, with overtones of mandarin orange.

It is an integral ingredient (along with sudachi, daidai, and other similar citrus fruits) in the citrus-based sauce ponzu, and yuzu vinegar is also produced. Yuzu is often combined with honey to make yuzu hachimitsu (柚子蜂蜜)—a kind of syrup that is used to make yuzu tea (柚子茶), or as an ingredient in alcoholic drinks such as the yuzu sour (柚子サワー). Yuzu kosho (also yuzukosho, literally "yuzu and pepper"), is a spicy Japanese sauce made from green or yellow yuzu zest, green or red chili peppers, and salt.

It is used to make liquor (such as yuzukomachi, 柚子小町) and wine. Slivered yuzu rind is used to garnish a savoury, salty egg-pudding dish called chawanmushi, as well as miso soup. It is often used along with sudachi and kabosu.

Yuzu is used to make various sweets including marmalade and cake. It is used extensively in the flavouring of many snack products, such as Doritos.

Korea
In Korean cuisine, yuja is most commonly used to make yuja-cheong (유자청, yuja marmalade) and yuja tea. Yuja-cheong can be made by sugaring peeled, depulped, and thinly sliced yuja, and yuja-cha (yuja tea) can be made by mixing hot water with yuja-cheong. Yuja-hwachae (유자화채, yuja punch), a variety of hwachae (fruit punch), is another common dessert made with yuja. Yuja is also a common ingredient in Korean-style western food, such as salads.

Other uses
Yuzu is also known for its characteristically strong aroma, and the oil from its skin is marketed as a fragrance. In Japan, bathing with yuzu on Tōji, the winter solstice, is a custom that dates to at least the early 18th century. Whole yuzu fruits are floated in the hot water of the bath, sometimes enclosed in a cloth bag, releasing their aroma. The fruit may also be cut in half, allowing the citrus juice to mingle with the bathwater. The yuzu bath, known commonly as yuzu yu (柚子湯), but also as yuzu buro (柚子風呂), is said to guard against colds, treat the roughness of skin, warm the body, and relax the mind.

The body of the taepyeongso, a Korean traditional oboe, close to the Chinese Suona or the Zurna, is often made from jujube, mulberry or yuzu wood.

Elsewhere
Beginning in the early 21st century, yuzu has been increasingly used by chefs in the United States and other Western nations, achieving notice in a 2003 article in The New York Times.

In the United States the Department of Agriculture banned the import of fresh yuzu from abroad — both the fruit and the trees.

Source: Wikipedia